525 Markham Road. Unit 4
Scarborough, Ontario M1H 3H7 Call Us (416) 628 4232 or (647) 524 6622

Effective Treatments for Cerebral Palsy, Brain Injury, and Post Stroke Recovery.

Focuses on repetition of movement – involving progressive resistance exercises and developmental skills to train and retrain
the brain, allowing movement to become both normalized and automatic.

Learn more

Top Ways To Help Children With Muscular Dystrophy Participate In Daily Activities

Book an Appointment
Revivo’s main goal is to provide Intensive Therapy for individuals suffering from various neurological disorders and injuries, such as
Cerebral Palsy, Brain Injury or Post Stroke condition.

Muscular dystrophy has no known cure yet but, this does not mean that children who have this genetic condition cannot get to enjoy daily activities normal children do. This is a disorder that develops early in childhood and you need to keep the child active to avoid muscle fibers from getting permanently damaged.

Keeping your child active helps them strengthen their muscles and this slows down its progression while alleviating the discomfort caused by the disease. You can further help your child deal with muscular dystrophy by seeking professional help from centers that offer muscular dystrophy therapy in Toronto. This article will help you identify ways that you can help your child with muscular dystrophy to participate more in daily activities.

Be keen to watch out for facial expressions

Children naturally learn to do a lot in the first three years of their lives. As a parent, you should actively get involved in your child’s development. A child with muscular dystrophy is no exception either and that is why it is important to start encouraging them at an early age on how to get involved in daily activities like taking a bath and dressing themselves.

Children suffering from muscular dystrophy will have a harder time in learning how to do the simple things but your role as a parent is to encourage their efforts so that they don’t get discouraged easily. Learn to communicate with your child early enough by watching their facial expressions and interpreting sounds and body language.

For example, children turn their heads when they are pointing to objects and they tend to turn their heads when they mean ‘no’. Do not ignore any sound your child makes because this means they are trying to communicate something. Showing interest to your child encourages them to participate more in daily activities.

Respond to your child as he communicates

DSC01382

It takes time, even for a parent to fully understand what a child is trying to communicate and requires patience. You should act confidently when you understand what your child is asking for and try as much as possible to respond to all their noises and actions. When communicating with your child, you should always place yourself on a face to face level.

You can try to imitate the sounds that your child is making and by copying any words they utter. You should not use long sentences when talking to your child and try to keep them simple so that they can follow. You can make communication fun for your child by using bright and noisy toys to attract the child’s attention.

Encourage your child to move more

You will need to carry your child around more but ensure that you give them room to move on their own. You can do this by holding them but leaving their arms and legs free so that they can strengthen their limb muscles. Offer balance in a way that allows them to look around. Place objects at a distance and encourage them to try to reach for these items as you offer your support. You can also encourage your child to stand more by supporting them with a frame.

Change lying and sitting positions to build muscle strength

Allowing a child to lie on their side gives them room to use their hands and feet more while lying on the stomach strengthens the neck, back and arm muscles. You can stretch their legs muscles by sitting them on the floor with their legs straight. You can sit your child on a chair to develop their upper body strength. Ensure that their feet are firmly placed on the floor or a footrest.

  • Testimonials

    My experience with Revivo has been very positive and elating. My family and I have noticed vast improvement in Zain and his ability to do normal day to day activities. I still remember the day I was told that Zain suffers from a neurological disorder called Cerebral Palsy and a very limited list of things he will be able to do on his own. He wasn’t able to control the involutary movements of his hands, or lift his head on his own or be able to sit without any support. Thanks to the TheraSuit therapy at Revivo, some of that has changed.

    Sadaf Mahmood, mother of Zain, 5 y.o. Read All
    I was very impressed with my son Thomas’ 3 week intensive block of suit therapy at Revivo Centre this summer. Being new and curious, I was eager to see how Thomas would respond to the input provided by the therapeutic suit and what if any freedom of movement it would provide. Because Thomas lacks the ability to balance and has further difficulty from excessive muscle tone in his legs, he cannot stand independently or walk - both require manual manipulation for safety and coordination.

    Linda Canning, mother of Thomas 9 y.o. Read All
  • We Help With

    Latest Publications

    A Novel, Highly Effective Approach to the Treatment of CP Patients MEET Thomas, a nine-year-old patient with Stage 5 cerebral palsy. According to Thomas’ mother, he lacks the ability to balance and has further difficulty from excessive muscle tone in his legs, and he cannot stand or walk independently – both require manual manipulation for safety and coordination. Read all
    The Importance of Strengthening The concept of strength development for cerebral palsy (CP) has recently become very popular. The idea of intensive therapy to treat patients with CP is supported by research. However, many professionals suffer from a lack of basic knowledge about strengthening physiology, strength training, adaptation to exercises, etc. Read all